Written by Prastitis Marbles on November 16, 2015 in Granites

As we close the door on 2015, lets take a look at what the design industry experts are saying about the coming year. As modern life gets busier and more pressured, our homes have become our sanctuaries. Centered around simplicity, serenity and seamlessness, the 2016 interior reflects our need to switch off and detox. Warm but calming colors are complimented by natural textures and soft shapes while furniture is becoming ever more tailored and intuitive, both at home and in the office.

Rose Quartz and Serenity

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Global color authority Pantone surprised the design community by naming not one but two colors for the 2016 edition of its Color of the Year forecast. The pastel pink Rose Quartz and powder blue Serenity may seem like a sugary sweet selection but according to Pantone, the pairing is in fact part of a more unilateral approach to color—a commentary on the current societal movements toward gender equality and fluidity.
Chiming with Pantone’s prediction, British wallpaper brand Graham & Brown’s 2016 forecast was full of dusty pinks and pale blues enlivened with warm metallic accents. Demonstrating how these contrasting shades can be united within a single design, Calico Studios prove that they were way ahead of the curve when they launched their Aurora line of wallpapers last year. Inspired by ombre skies, the 16 gradient designs were created by dying organic linen with ultramarine and indigo dyes.

 

Design Detox

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Offering a complete color palette cleanse, some of the major wallpaper and paint brands are moving towards quiet and calming hues for 2016. New York-based hospitality designer and entrepreneur Stacy Garcia tells us ‘the growing emphasis on this need to always be connected has created a movement to find quiet simplicity amongst the noise.’
Signaling a move away from cold greys to warm stone hues in 2016, Sherwin-Williams has announced Alabaster (SW 7008), a hue symbolic of new beginnings, as its 2016 Color of the Year. Also wiping the slate clean is paint brand Benjamin Moore, who has selected Simply White OC-117 shade as its 2016 Color of the Year while Valspar paint says that its restorative 2016 color palette ‘Comfort Zone’ is an antidote to a ‘fast-paced lifestyle’ and will ‘balance the mind, body and spirit.’

Warm Metals

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Particularly effective in the bathroom and kitchen space, rose gold, brass, copper and gold will continue to dominate in 2016 according to London-based interior designer Gemma Gordon-Duff of Gordon–Duff & Linton who suggests pairing them with raw, natural materials such as marble and wood. “Good quality materials like this are a great investment because they will never go out of style,” she advises.
Made of a copper and gold alloy mixture, the 18-carat patina of Dornbracht’s non-corrosive electroplated surface Cyprum is the first new finish to be launched by Dornbracht since 2009. Patricia Urquiola’s two-part Cuna bath for Agape features a thermoformed solid surface tub supported by a tubular copper frame. Arik Levy’s Bowl collection for Spanish bathroom brand Inbani mixes white ceramic with copper and marble details.

 

Rough Luxe

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“Instant aging of materials and adding texture and depth to a space always helps add to the experience,” says Jon Sherman Founder & Creative Director of Brooklyn-based wallpaper company Flavor Paper, who predicts that papers that mimic industrial finishes will be big news in 2016.
“Being able to add some grime or roughness to a very sterile environment adds an unexpected touch and intrigues the senses,” says Sherman of Flavor Paper’s textural designs, Teardrop Wall, Charred Cedar and Galapagos Wall, which bring roughness into the interior but without the cost, weight and problematic depth. Similarly Piet Hein Eek’s latest tromp l’oeil effect papers for manufacturer NLXL resemble architectural materials such as painted bricks and salvaged wood. Sculptor John Whitmarsh’s new cement tile collections for Clé are made by taking gypsum cement castings from reclaimed materials such as pallets, roadside guardrail posts, and discarded metals